Aaron Rodgers: ‘I’m Like The Scott Stapp’ (Creed) Of The Packers

Green Bay Packers: Can Aaron Rodgers Win the NFL MVP in 2013?

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Most draft pundits predicted the crimson tide standout would be the first running back off the board, sometime late in the first… Via AllGreenBayPackers.com | 4 days ago Tramon Williams on the ground with an injured shoulder is something Packers fans do not want to see in 2013. Injuries suck. Injuries suck worse when they occur to players who suit up for the Green Bay Packers. What makes injuries even more sucky is that the serious ones linger into the following season, or lead to once-good players getting released (hello, Desmond Bishop). The Packers… Fantasy Fox: Choose Your QB — Peyton vs. Rodgers Via Fox Sports South | 6 days ago Today’s installment of Choose Your Quarterback pits Aaron Rodgers vs. Peyton Manning, the Nos. 1 and 3 assets in my rankings of the 32 presumed starting quarterbacks.

Aaron Rodgers’ Consistent Impact On the Packers’ Running Game

That might well be the case. But Rodgers would be naive to assume that the Packers or any NFL team would capitalize on the discount — at least not in the desired fashion. There are no quid pro quos in the NFL, and if you don’t believe me, look at what has transpired this offseason between the New England Patriots and quarterback Tom Brady . As NFC West blogger Mike Sando and I discussed on the Inside Slant podcast, Brady signed a contract extension that added $3 million in guarantees to his current deal but locked him in to below-market salaries for the 2015, ’16 and ’17 seasons. Although Brady never directly acknowledged it, the widely held assumption was that he had granted the Patriots extra financial flexibility to maintain an elite team. Weeks later, of course, the Patriots stood firm on an offer to free agent receiver Wes Welker — one of Brady’s favorite teammates — and watched as he signed with the Denver Broncos . And in case there was any confusion about the Patriots’ operation after Brady’s deal, owner Bob Kraft had this to say at the recent NFL owners meeting: “I don’t answer to Tom Brady.” Kraft went on to deny any hard feelings that might have arisen from Welker’s departure and added: “[Brady] never put a demand or expected anything when he did what he did. He never put quid pro quos, and to be honest, we wouldn’t have accepted them had he done that. He did what he thought and what he did was tremendous. It’s given our team a real competitive advantage to be in a position to win. And now it’s how well our personnel people make the decisions.” In other words, the Patriots continued doing business as usual after Brady’s agreement.

That is an amazing statistic. When Brett Favre preceded Rodgers as the starting quarterback of the Packers for 16 years, including three straight NFL MVP awards, Favre never had a quarterback Aaron Rodgers Womens Jersey rating above 100. The highest quarterback rating Favre ever had was a 99.5 mark in 1995. Secondly, the Packers look to have a much better balanced offense in 2013, thanks to the additions of rookie running backs Eddie Lacy and Johnathan Franklin. Rodgers should be able to utilize his play-action passes more often this year and be able to go deep more often. In 2012, Rodgers often saw his defensive opponents playing their two safeties deep. Why? The defenses did not respect the running game of the Packers. That should all change in 2013. Rodgers also has plenty of weapons in the passing game, even with the retirement of Donald Driver and Greg Jennings leaving the team via free agency. Rodgers still has the Big Three, which has Jordy Nelson, James Jones and Randall Cobb as his primary wide receiver options.

Aaron Rodgers and a ‘hometown discount’

Here are Rodgers’ raw rushing numbers over his five years as the starting QB for the Packers. Year 4.8 2 These statistics show remarkable consistency on Rodgers’ part in escaping the pocket and making things happen with his legs. In each season as a starter, he has also had at least one run of 21 yards or more, so he is not necessarily just limited to picking up small amounts of yardage at a time; he is also capable of breaking the occasional big play with his legs. Now let’s take a look at how much of the team’s rushing load Rodgers has been responsible for. Year 2 22.2% Note that these percentages do not take into account the two games Rodgers did not start – namely the New England game in 2010 and the Week 17 Detroit game in 2011. What does this tell us? Well, one thing I interpret from Rodgers’ raw numbers is that he is running on a consistent number of plays, and that this is almost certainly due to scrambling rather than called running plays. Obviously, the Packers are not going to put Rodgers at risk by using the read option or other deliberate running plays, so this is no surprise. Packers’ Rushing Leaders 2008: Ryan Grant , 1,203 yards 2009: Grant, 1,253 2012: Alex Green , 464 The fact that his total number of carries stays consistent while his percentage of the team’s total carries has varied is just another data point that indicates that Rodgers’ runs are unplanned and have nothing to do directly with the Packers’ offensive game plans. When the team got away from the run more in the 2010 and 2011 season, those scrambles took up a greater proportion of the team’s running plays, and when they tried to re-establish the run more in 2012, Rodgers’ carries stayed consistent but accounted for less of the team’s overall running game. One thing is certain: Rodgers’ ability to scramble helps both the passing game’s effectiveness and makes the Packers’ rushing attack look more effective than it would otherwise.

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